For quilt was designed and made in 1990

            For my critical analysis, I have
chosen the piece of art by Faith Ringgold. It is called “Tar Beach 2” Quilt.

This quilt was designed and made in 1990 in the town of Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania. The medium of this artwork is a multicolored screen-print on silk
plain weave, printed cotton plain weave, and black and green synthetic moiré.

In my opinion, I believe this piece of art represents realism. Ringgold is
trying very hard this artwork to represent the subject matter truthfully. She
is also trying to depict a representation of the character’s reality and story,
which also supports my opinion of it showing realism. The subject or main idea
represented in Tar Beach 2 is the painted narrative on the quilt. Ringgold is
attempting to denounce racism and discrimination by combining the story telling
through the images throughout the quilt and her hand written texts upon it.

            The scene is surrounded with cloth
square shapes, many of which have floral patterns. At the top of the quilt,
more shapes or rectangles contain text, which includes the girl’s story. Upon studying
this piece of art, I noticed that almost all of the vertical lines used in Tar
Beach 2 helps construct the New York City skyline and the furniture up on top
of the roof. I also noticed that the diagonal lines form the shape of the roof
and the shape of the George Washington Bridge. The shortening of lines on the
bridge make it appear 3D (three dimensional) out into space. I have seen how
Ringgold’s use of conflicting vertical and diagonal lines makes up an intertwining
three part structural separation in the image: the city, the bridge, and the
roof. Ringgold’s use of quilting in the image reiterates the relationship of
vertical and diagonal lines and strengthens the dynamic quality of the artwork.

            The narrator in Tar Beach 2 is the one
of the little girls lying on the blanket near the bottom of the quilt. The
story told echoes with a common wish: to be free to go wherever she wants for
the rest of her life. The buildings of New York City can be valued for their common
components (shape, line, color), and can be appreciated for their importance in
telling the story. By implementing a naïve or folk method that dodges
perception and shading, Ringgold implies that the understanding portrayed in
the work is being conveyed honestly and freely from inside the internal life of
her character. 

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