Newspapers 1690, when Benjamin Harris printed Public Occurrences,

Newspapers were an intense involvement of human
history. Originating in Germany, the new printing press altered the extent and impact
of the newspaper, paving the way for modern-day journalism. The first weekly
newspapers to hire Gutenberg’s press occurred in 1609. In Renaissance Europe,
handwritten newsletters were distributed confidentially among wholesalers,
passing along information about everything from wars and economic conditions to
social customs and “human interest” features. Although the papers did
not name the cities in which they were printed to evade government tyranny,
their exact location can be acknowledged because of their use of the German
language. Notwithstanding these apprehensions over coercion, the papers were a accomplishment,
and newspapers quickly spread through Central Europe. In England, newspapers
were free of governments control, and people began to feed off of the free
press. Papers took advantage of this new freedom and began publishing regularly.

Published every two weeks, papers had ad space to fun the paper production. This
made humble journalists into business men. When publishers observed the increasing
acceptance and income impending of newspapers, they founded daily publications.

Newspapers did not come to the American colonies until September 25, 1690, when
Benjamin Harris printed Public Occurrences, before fleeing to America for printing
an article about a purported Catholic plot against England, Harris had been a
newspaper editor in England. Fourteen years passed before the next American
newspaper, The Boston News-Letter, launched. Fifteen years later, The Boston
Gazette began publication, followed instantaneously by the American Weekly
Mercury in Philadelphia. Newspaper organizations remain applicable because they
publish news and information and get it out to the world when readers want it
newspapers are there for their readers, providing timely reports of events as
they happen. But the headlines and timely reports are only part of the job.

Readers want to know not just “what happened,” they want to know “how” and
“why,” and they want to comprehend the implications nearby the event.

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