The recognise the material, its texture and condition

The knife is drawn in a dotted technique,
highlighting corroded parts with a thicker stipples , thus there is a full
insight of the texture of the object. This means that illustration provides
enough information to recognise the material, its texture and condition of it.

Notwithstanding that the illustration is well drawn, there are evident visual
drawbacks such as: no identification of the blade on the drawing, therefore
without any description in the report it is complicated to recognise the blade,
that is also depicted on the illustration. 
Another mistake on that illustration is that there is no scale that
would help to understand the size of objects, thus the viewer will not be able
to get the full picture about the iron knife. As the report says the iron peg
was possibly a part of the canal between 1748 and 1800, therefore for
archaeologists it has no significance. The last three objects are cannon balls
(Fig 12,13,14) that were used from around blacked in corroded parts. There is a
scale under the (Fig 12) and (Fig 13) that equals 10cm, but this scale is
useless for these drawings as it is located right in the middle between
drawings (Fig 15), thus the viewer cannot use this scale to get the right size
of objects. Whereas, drawings shows thickness of these cannons. This means that
these drawings can be easily used by other archaeologists to analyse these
objects due to its detailed illustration of texture and shape. These cannons
are depicted in a stipple technique and using outline lines in order to highlight
shapes. However, the lighting is totally wrong as there are shadows that
usually are drawn when there is a light from the top left. Figure 14 is the
most inaccurate with overly thickened outlines, that  creates quite distorted view. Nevertheless,
these cannons are important objects valued by archaeologists as they are
associated with the Battle of the Boyne that took place in July in 1690 from 8
am and 12 noon. 

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